Del.icio.us as a research tool

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My system of keeping track of interesting sites is quite muddled. I use old-fashioned bookmarks in my browser; sticky notes with urls can be found lingering in the corners of my Apple Dashboard; I mail interesting links to whoever I think is interested; I stick links into WordPress posts I think I might at some point write about a subject; I use the nifty research tool Zotero to keep track of research links; and I haphazardly use del.icio.us – but that hasn’t kept me from growing a collection of tags that already looks too unwieldy to me.

If you are like me, then Wess Daniels’ Tips for using Delicious in (doctoral) research may be the thing for you. The post is full of useful tips on organizing your tabs, using the notes feature, and combining your use of del.icio.us with tumblr and DevonThink.

See also how de.icio.us is changing academic research and the del.icio.us blog itself for ideas on the use of social bookmarking in education.

h/t: Academhack

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2 thoughts on “Del.icio.us as a research tool

  1. I’m not sure why in particular a delicious a/c for research needs its own special approach. I have given the tagging thing way toooo much thought over the years. I have 2 a/cs – one for me and one for blog; the first having a very large tag range and the latter being purposefully designed to be constrained to a relatively small number of tags.

    I guess I’ve come to the conclusion – and I really don’t think it matters tooo much whether it’s personal or research or blog – that a certain heirarchy of tags is best. By this I mean that having a core group of tags is a very good idea, particularly if you want to just scan back through associated links.

    But the magic comes from greater detail for me. I now use quite a lot of tags (not heaps but more than 2 or 3 ususally) augmented by a decent description. I do this because it makes searching more powerful both in terms of *how* I might remember a link (subject, author, title – each of which may come to mind when I’m trying to refind it) and more importantly, it allows a larger number of potential search terms to be used in the delicious search engine to retrieve a saved link.

    So I might tag something with *essay* *geography* *australia* *smith* which will make it eminently retrievable —- it let’s me not have to remember *how* to remember, it increases the options for *how* it can be found.

    2c

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