Early Modern Literature and Bodily Experience

contreblason-du-ventreTogether with a friend and colleague from Leiden University who works on perceptions of pain in early modern English poetry, I am trying to put together a panel on Early Modern Literature and bodily experience for the Venice conference of the Renaissance Society of America in 2010. Do send me an email if you are interested, or leave a comment of course!

CFP – Early Modern Literature and Bodily Experience

Panel at the Renaissance Society of America Annual Conference, Venice, April 2010

This session invites papers on the relations between early modern literature and bodily experience, with a focus on two related questions:

How did early modern literary texts represent embodiment?
How did early modern culture conceive of the bodily effects of reading literature and watching plays, and of writing literature and acting?

In investigating these questions, participants are invited to look specifically at early modern conceptions of sensory perception, the physiology of the emotions, physical health, illness and suffering, and at the different political, religious and social contexts in which these topics took shape.

Please submit an abstract in English before 1 May 2009 to both co-chairs:

Jan Frans van Dijkhuizen (J[dot]van[dot]Dijkhuizen[at]hum[dot]leidenuniv[dot]nl)
and Kristine Steenbergh (k[dot]steenbergh[at]let[dot]vu[dot]nl).

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The image above is taken from a site I just discovered – the Renaissance Body Project at Stanford University, with an archive of renaissance images of the body.

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