The body


Additions welcome! Please mail me at k[dot]steenbergh[at]let[dot]vu[dot]nl.

[Bibliography substantially expanded with additions sent by Brett D. Hirsch – thanks Brett!]

  1. Barker, Francis. The Tremulous Private Body: Essays on Subjection. London and New York: Methuen, 1984.
  2. Billing, Christian M. Masculinity, Corporality and the English Stage 1580-1635. Forthcoming with Ashgate, September 2008.
  3. Božovi?, Miran. An Utterly Dark Spot: Gaze and Body in Early Modern Philosophy. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000.
  4. Calbi, Maurizio. Approximate Bodies: Gender and Power in Early Modern Drama and Anatomy. London: Routledge, 2003.
  5. Callaghan, Dympna. “Body Problems.” Shakespeare Studies 29 (2001), 68-71.
  6. Clark, Stuart. Vanities of the Eye: Vision in Early Modern European Culture. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007.
  7. Craik, Katherine A. Reading Sensations in Early Modern England. Early Modern Literature in History Series. Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.
  8. Crane, Mary Thomas. Shakespeare’s Brain: Reading With Cognitive Theory. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1999.
  9. Crawford, Patricia. Blood, Bodies, and Families in Early Modern England. Harlow: Longman, 2004.
  10. Egan, Jim. Authorizing Experience: Refigurations of the Body Politic in Seventeenth-century New England Writing. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1999.
  11. Egmond, Florike and Robert Zwijnenberg, eds. Bodily Extremities: Preoccupations with the Human Body in Early Modern European Culture. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2003.
  12. Elam, Kier. “‘In What Chapter of His Bosom’: Reading Shakespeare’s Bodies.” In: Terence Hawkes, ed. Alternative Shakespeares, volume 2. London and New York: Routledge, 1996.
  13. Enterline, Lynn. The Rhetoric of the Body from Ovid to Shakespeare. Cambridge Studies in Renaissance Literature and Culture. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.
  14. Erickson, Robert A. The Language of the Heart, 1600-1750. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1997.
  15. Fisher, Will. Materializing Gender in Early Modern English Literature and Culture. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006.
  16. Fissell, Mary E. Vernacular Bodies: The Politics of Reproduction in Early Modern England. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006.
  17. Fitzpatrick, Joan. Food in Shakespeare: Early Modern Dietaries and the Plays. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2007.
  18. Floyd-Wilson, Mary. English Ethnicity and Race in Early Modern Drama. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003.
  19. Floyd-Wilson, Mary, Matthew Greenfield, Gail Kern Paster, Tanya Pollard, Katherine Rowe, and Julian Yates. “Shakespeare and Embodiment: An E-Conversation.” Literature Compass 2 (2005), 1-13.
  20. Floyd-Wilson, Mary and Garrett A. Sullivan Jr. eds. Embodiment and Environment in Early Modern Drama and Performance. Renaissance Drama 35 (2006).
  21. Floyd-Wilson, Mary and Garrett A. Sullivan Jr. eds. Environment and Embodiment in Early Modern England. Early Modern Literature in History Series. Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.
  22. Fudge, Erica, Ruth Gilbert, and Susan Wiseman, eds. At the Borders of the Human: Beasts, Bodies and Natural Philosophy in the Early Modern Period. Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2002.
  23. Gent, Lucy and Nigel Llewellyn, ed. Renaissance Bodies: The Human Figure in Renaissance Culture c. 1450-1660. London: Reaktion Books, 1990.
  24. Gilbert, Ruth. Early Modern Hermaphrodites: Sex and Other Stories. Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2002.
  25. Gil, Daniel Juan. Before Intimacy: Asocial Sexuality in Early Modern England. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2006.
  26. Gottler, Christine, and Wolfgang Neuber, ed. Spirits Unseen: The Representation of Subtle Bodies in Early Modern European Culture. Leiden: Brill, 2007.
  27. Gowing, Laura. Common Bodies: Women, Touch and Power in Seventeenth-Century England. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2003.
  28. Grantley, Darryll, and Nina Taunton, ed. The Body in Late Medieval and Early Modern Culture. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2000.
  29. Harrawood, Michael. “High-Stomached Lords: Imagination, Force, and the Body in Shakespeare’s Henry VI Plays.” Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies 7:1 (2007).
  30. Harris, Jonathan Gill. Foreign Bodies and the Body Politic: Discourses of Social Pathology in Early Modern England. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998.
  31. Harvey, Elizabeth D. ed. Sensible Flesh: On Touch in Early Modern Culture. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2003.
  32. Healey, Margaret. Fictions of Disease in Early Modern England: Bodies, Plagues and Politics. New York: Palgrave, 2001.
  33. Hillman, David and Carla Mazzio, eds. The Body in Parts: Fantasies of Corporeality in Early Modern Europe. New York and London: Routledge, 1997.
  34. Hillman, David. Shakespeare’s Entrails: Belief, Scepticism and the Interior of the Body. Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2007.
  35. Keller, Eve. Generating Bodies and Gendered Selves: The Rhetoric of Reproduction in Early Modern England. Washington: University of Washington Press, 2007.
  36. Knuuttila, Simo, and Pekka Karkkainen, eds. Theories of Perception in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. New York: Springer, 2008.
  37. Laqueur, Thomas. Making Sex: Body and Gender from Greeks to Freud. Cambridge, MA and London, England: Harvard University Press, 1992.
  38. Levy-Navarro, Elena. The Culture of Obesity in Early and Late Modernity: Body Image in Shakespeare, Jonson, Middleton, and Skelton. Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008.
  39. Long, Kathleen P. Hermaphrodites in Renaissance Europe. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2006.
  40. McMullan, Gordon, ed. Renaissance Configurations: Voices, Bodies, Spaces, 1580-1690. Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave, 2001.
  41. Moss, Stephanie, and Kaara L. Peterson, ed. Disease, Diagnosis, and Cure on the Early Modern Stage. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2004.
  42. McTavish, Lianne. Childbirth and the Display of Authority in Early Modern France. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2005.
  43. Moncrief, Kathryn M., and Kathryn R. McPherson, ed. Performing Maternity in Early Modern England. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2007.
  44. Nunn, Hillary M. Staging Anatomies: Dissection and Spectacle in Early Stuart Tragedy. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2005.
  45. Owens, Margaret E. Stages of Dismemberment: The Fragmented Body in Late Medieval and Early Modern Drama Newark, DE: University of Delaware Press, 2005.
  46. Park, Katherine. Secrets of Women: Gender, Generation and the Origins of Human Dissection. New York: Zone Books, 2006.
  47. Paster, Gail Kern. The Body Embarrassed: Drama and the Disciplines of Shame in Early Modern England. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1993.
  48. Paster, Gail Kern. Humoring the Body: Emotions and the Shakespearean Stage. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004.
  49. Paster, Gail Kern, Katherine Rowe and Mary Floyd-Wilson. Reading the Early Modern Passions: Essays in the Cultural History of Emotion. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2004.
  50. Price, Merrall Llewelyn. Consuming Passions: The Uses of Cannibalism in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe. London and New York: Routledge, 2003.
  51. Roodenburg, Herman. The Eloquence of the Body: Perspectives on Gesture in the Dutch Republic. Zwolle: Waanders, 2004.
  52. Rublack, U. “Fluxes: the Early Modern Body and the Emotions.” History Workshop Journal 53:1 (2002): 1-16.
  53. Saint-Saëns, Alain, ed. Religion, Body and Gender in Early Modern Spain. San Francisco: Edwin Mellen, 1991.
  54. Sawday, Jonathan. The Body Emblazoned: Dissection and the Human Body in Renaissance Culture. London and New York: Routledge, 1995.
  55. Sawday, Jonathan. Engines of the Imagination: Renaissance Culture and the Rise of the Machine. London and New York: Routledge, 2007.
  56. Schoenfeldt, Michael. Bodies and Selves in Early Modern England: Physiology and Inwardness in Spenser, Shakespeare, Herbert, and Milton. Cambridge Studies in Renaissance Literature and Culture. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999.
  57. Scholtz, Susanne. Body Narratives: Writing the Nation and Fashioning the Subject in Early Modern England. Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2000.
  58. Seuntjens, Wolter. “Vapours and Fumes, Damps and Qualms: Windy Passions in the Early-Modern Age (1600-1800).” English Studies 87, no. 1 (2006): 35-52.
  59. Silverman, Lisa. Tortured Subjects: Pain, Truth, and the Body in Early Modern France. Chicago: Chicago University Press, 2001.
  60. Smith, Bruce R. The Acoustic World of Early Modern England: Attending to the O-Factor. Chicago: Chicago University Press, 1999.
  61. Stanivukovic, Goran V., ed. Ovid and the Renaissance Body. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2001.
  62. Strier, Richard and Carla Mazzio. “Two Responses to ‘Shakespeare and Embodiment: An E-Conversation.’” Literature Compass 3 (2005), 15-31.
  63. Sullivan, Garrett A. Jr. Memory and Forgetting in English Renaissance Drama: Shakespeare, Marlowe, Webster. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005.
  64. Thompson, Ayanna. Performing Race and Torture on the Early Modern Stage. New York: Routledge, 2007.
  65. Toulalan, Sarah. Imagining Sex: Pornography and Bodies in Seventeenth-Century England. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007.
  66. West-Pavlov, Russell. Bodies and Their Spaces: System, Crisis and Transformation in Early Modern Theatre.Amsterdam and New York: Rodopi, 2006.
  67. Zimmerman, Susan. The Early Modern Corpse and Shakespeare’s Theatre. (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2005).

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7 thoughts on “The body

  1. Pingback: Reading sensations at Serendipities

  2. It’s actually from Vesalius, the source of most of Crooke’s engravings. Expect a long email from me with additions for the bibliography soon Kristine! B.

  3. Pingback: Carnivalesque 44 « Mercurius Politicus

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